Frequent Questions

When must scaffolding and vertical shrouding be used on an exterior renovation when other buildings are in close proximity to the work area?

Question (23002-23847)

When must scaffolding and vertical shrouding be used on an exterior renovation when other buildings are in close proximity to the work area?

Answer

The certified renovator or a worker under the direction of the certified renovator must contain the work area so that dust or debris does not leave the work area while the renovation is being performed.  The certified renovator must be on site while the containment is established and is responsible for ensuring that dust or debris does not spread beyond the work area.  The extent to which scaffolding and vertical shrouding are needed to meet this standard will depend on the conditions at the work site.  

When performing exterior renovations you must cover the ground with plastic sheeting or other disposable impermeable material extending 10 feet beyond the perimeter of surfaces undergoing renovation or a sufficient distance to collect falling paint debris, whichever is greater, unless the property line prevents 10 feet of such ground covering.  Ground containment measures may stop at the edge of the vertical barrier when using a vertical containment system.  If the renovation will affect surfaces within 10 feet of the property line, the renovation firm must erect vertical containment or equivalent extra precautions in containing the work area to ensure that dust and debris from the renovation does not contaminate adjacent buildings or migrate to adjacent properties.  Vertical containment or equivalent extra precautions in containing the work area may also be necessary in other situations in order to prevent contamination of other buildings, other areas of the property, or adjacent buildings or properties.

Have more questions? Submit a request